Eye Disorders

Not all eye diseases require surgery. Often detecting eye disease early and regular monitoring is the best way to protect against loss of vision. Early detection is also important in determining the best treatment plan. Many of our treatments including laser surgery are done in the Lakeville Eye Associates Laser Suite. Dr. Kirber and Dr. Tantri often work together to help treat eyes that require a hospital surgical suite.

Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in older adults. It is a progressive condition characterized by a gradual loss of vision in the central area of the visual field. Over time,
AMD destroys the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision needed for seeing objects clearly while looking straight ahead. It can advance very slowly or progress more quickly, and may lead to a loss of vision in one or both eyes; it does not cause complete blindness though only peripheral vision will remain. For more information, please visit the National Eye Institute's page on AMD.

Glaucoma is a group of diseases which damage the nerve which connects the eye to the brain. This can be associated with increased pressure in the eye, so checking intraocular pressure during an eye exam is one part of diagnosing this disease. Because glaucoma starts by damaging a person's peripheral vision, visual field testing machines can aid in the early diagnosis. Untreated glaucoma can lead to partial or complete loss of vision. Early detection and treatment can protect against serious vision loss. For more information, please visit the National Eye Institute's page on Glaucoma.

Diabetic Eye Disease is not one disease but rather a group of eye problems those with diabetes may suffer from as a complication of diabetes. All can cause severe loss of vision or complete blindness. Some of these conditions are Diabetic Retinopathy or damage to the retina's blood vessels, Cataract or clouding of the lens of the eye (while common in older people, cataracts develop at an earlier age in those with diabetes), and Glaucoma or optic nerve damage caused by increased fluid pressure inside the eye (diabetes doubles an adult's risk of getting glaucoma). For more information, please visit the National Eye Institute's page on Diabetic Eye Disease.

Dry Eye is an eye disease caused by decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Along with dry eye, inflammation of the surface of the eye may occur. If left untreated, this dryness and inflammation can lead to pain, ulcers, or scars on the cornea, and some loss of vision. However, permanent vision loss from dry eye is uncommon. More often dry eye is uncomfortable and can make some activities difficult, particularly reading and computer use. For more information, please visit the National Eye Institute's page on Dry Eye.